What the College Admissions Scandal Tells us About Lawyers Ethics

Jordan Furlong has written a blog post so good it has me fizzing with excitement. The hairs on my arms and neck are, quite literally, standing on end. The writing is brilliant. And the story is really important. It combines both the social and ethical problems that face the legal profession. And it combines them … Continue reading What the College Admissions Scandal Tells us About Lawyers Ethics

Law Society’s Practice Note on NDAs: I vote for its withdrawal

My recently submitted written submission to the Women and Equalities Committee are now up on their website. It covers a range of things, including the Arcadia case, but one issue of more specialised interest might be worth highlighting on this blog. I wrote a section on "Regulator and professional failures to recognise and warn of … Continue reading Law Society’s Practice Note on NDAs: I vote for its withdrawal

New York, London, Paris,* Munich,. Everyone’s talking about… Linklaters

Linklaters v Mellish [2019] EWHC 177 (QB) has brought the issue of how law firms deal with sexual harassment, and how the courts deal with confidentiality, back into the spotlight. The case concerns Frank Mellish, formerly Director of Business Development and Marketing at Linklaters. He didn't last long, being employed in March 2017 and being … Continue reading New York, London, Paris,* Munich,. Everyone’s talking about… Linklaters

FCA Senior Manager’s Regime: a one word response – Barclays?

The FCA has produced a response to its sixteen-month-old consultation on the relationship between the Senior Manager Regime and the legal function. It is another consultation. In it, they propose “excluding the Legal Function from the Overall Responsibility Requirement.” The reasons for so doing, appear to centre on: The bulk of respondents to their last … Continue reading FCA Senior Manager’s Regime: a one word response – Barclays?

Should Clifford Chance’s corruption initiative be taken seriously?

The leaders of large law firms could do worse than ponder carefully the current trials of the accountancy sector. A series of reports, including the UK Competition and Markets Authority one yesterday, point to significant problems – substantive and reputational. The words that caught my eye in the FT's report (£) were about company directors, … Continue reading Should Clifford Chance’s corruption initiative be taken seriously?

Book Launch: In-House Lawyers’ Ethics: Institutional Logics, Legal Risk and the Tournament of Influence

Please join us on 29 January 2019 for the launch of In-House Lawyers' Ethics: Institutional Logics, Legal Risk and the Tournament of Influence, written by Richard Moorhead and Steven Vaughan, of UCL’s Faculty of Laws, and Cristina Godinho, of Lisbon University Institute.  In-house lawyers are regularly exhorted to be more commercial, proactive and strategic, to be … Continue reading Book Launch: In-House Lawyers’ Ethics: Institutional Logics, Legal Risk and the Tournament of Influence

In-House Lawyers: Ethics and Institutional Logics

Steven Vaughan, Cristina Godhino, and my book In-house Lawyers Ethics: Institutional Logics, Legal Risk and the Tournament of Influence is available for purchase from today in hard and electronic versions. It explores data from over 60 interviews and UCL’s Mapping the Moral Compass survey. Paul Gilbert has very kindly reviewed the book here. UCL’s Centre for Ethics and Law will … Continue reading In-House Lawyers: Ethics and Institutional Logics